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Northwest Iowa Community College Annual Report Northwest Iowa Community College is working to find new ways to educate and better serve students. Within the last year, the College has implemented some significant changes to classroom instruction and added equipment and facilities that will benefit students. Classroom settings need to vary according to students’ needs. Gone are the days of every class being taught in sixteen week increments. NCC’s Arts and Science students are now able to enroll in a variety of courses during the regular semester that are as short as four weeks in length. The ability to offer classes that are different lengths enables students to begin courses at times other than the beginning of the traditional semester. Furthermore, NCC now offers Fast Track courses during college breaks. Formerly known as 7x7 courses, these classes now follow a hybrid model that requires four days of on-campus instruction followed by two weeks of online curriculum. NCC was proud to partner with MOC-FV and Unity Christian school districts to create a “Career Academy” in Orange City. The Career Academy is a location away from NCC’s main campus where high school students can receive college level credit and get practical hands-on experience in courses related to the health or manufacturing fields. These fields were highlighted due to the high need of skilled workers, specifically in Northwest Iowa. Everything about the Career Academy, including classroom set up and course curriculum, was designed around STEM practices, such as tables set-up for group projects and brainstorming, instead of traditional desks. Seventy-one students from MOC-FV and Unity Christian attended the Career Academy in the Fall of 2013. I love computers and physics and this class offered college credit...it was a total win. The Iowa-Advanced Manufacturing (I-AM) Grant was able to fund new equipment that has changed the way classes in the labs are taught in our Welding and Design Technology programs. Welding received a Fanuc/Lincoln Robotic Cell for advanced robotic welding training. The Design Technology program received the Dimension Stratasys SST 1200es 3D-Printer, a machine that actually creates out of plastic the piece the student is designing, and has the capability to inject a dissolvable support material in the middle of the prototype. A Dimension Objet 30 3D-Printer was also incorporated into classroom learning. This printer maintains a higher accuracy of the components it is producing and uses Polyjet Technology. A Makerbot 3D-Printer was also purchased and is utilized not only in the classroom but also as a recruiting tool. This machine is mobile, which allows it to be brought to local high schools to demonstrate the technology that is being used in the Design Technology field. Lastly, a Master3DGage Arm was acquired. This machine is used to reverse-engineer already existing parts, and it also inspects newly created pieces to make sure they are accurately measured and are perfectly created for industry standards. With the new equipment listed above, students are drawing the blueprints, printing a 3-D prototype, and going through quality assurance inspections in their daily classwork. To date, students have been able to make everything from linked chains to a working electric guitar as class projects! 8 “ — John Heynen (pictured on f”ar left) Unity Christian Senior and Career Academy student


Annual_Report13-14
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