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Alumni_Magazine_Spring2017

I was informed that we had 72 hours to prepare for the first Ebola patient. 5 During the Ebola outbreak, Emory University saw four different patients come through with Ebola. Brian was one of four employees on staff that was responsible for the disposal of 4.5 tons of Ebola waste generated during the time these patients were cared for. This also required Brian to complete twice-a-day wellness checks for six months in Orlando, Press Ganey Conference the slight chance he would become contaminated. Wellness checks and long hours weren’t the only thing different about Brian’s life for those long months. With all the news coverage and the strong feelings about the role the United States should play in the containment of the disease, Brian and his family were under a lot of stress. “People who didn’t work in the hospital and didn’t understand the disease treated you differently. It was fear of the unknown, and they were afraid to interact with me and my family.” Furthermore, the Frislie family found it difficult to watch TV or listen to the radio because of the intense and sometimes skewed media coverage. “I had 100% confidence in my team. There were no egos, just the mentality that we need to pull together as a team.” All four patients survived, and no team members became ill with the lethal disease due to processes and practices of Brian’s staff. Based on Brian’s experience with Ebola, he became a subject matter expert on the topic. He was contacted about process and procedures from hospitals nationwide, including the White House, the National Institute of Health, the World Healthcare Organization, and the Center for Disease Control (CDC). He met President Barack Obama on September 16, 2014, at the CDC offices to share lessons learned, and then disseminate the information to hospitals in West Africa. Brian has Meeting with President Clinton Oct 2014 also met Former President Bill Clinton and John Kelly from the United States Marines (now in charge of Home Land Security), who wanted to know more about the disease and waste management. Brian has since led webinars, given many speeches on Ebola waste management, and co-authored articles about the proper Ebola waste disposal. “We don’t push mops, we save lives,” states Brian. Although he doesn’t lay bricks as an occupation, his knowledge in construction has definitely benefited him as he continued to grow in his career. A lot of Brian’s time is spent on construction, facility improvement, finish selection and building flow. Brian says his background in bricklaying and masonry does come in handy as he reviews blueprints, examines hospital inefficiencies, and finds logical and safe ways to remove waste from the facility. It has also helped with containing construction mess and potential unsanitary conditions during hospital remodels. Brian still has bricklaying tools in his garage and likes to dabble in carpentry work in what little free time he has. And even though Brian has since changed job duties (in 2015, Frislie accepted a position as Business Manager at NOVO Health Services, which is a healthcare laundry and textile rental company focused on acute healthcare facilities), he is still a consultant on the Ebola containment. And his passion for effective ways to clean medical equipment and facilities is still as strong as ever. Brian’s Success is Our Story


Alumni_Magazine_Spring2017
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